Poucas palavras:

Blog criado por Bruno Coriolano de Almeida Costa, professor de Língua Inglesa desde 2002. Esse espaço surgiu em 2007 com o objetivo de unir alguns estudiosos e professores desse idioma. Abordamos, de forma rápida e simples, vários aspectos da Língua Inglesa e suas culturas. Agradeço a sua visita.

"Se tivesse perguntado ao cliente o que ele queria, ele teria dito: 'Um cavalo mais rápido!"

sábado, 1 de agosto de 2015

Who was Maud Gonne?

I was trying to upload a video about W. B. Yeats – a video I have made myself while I was in Dublin -, but YouTube didn’t allow me to do so (don’t ask me why) when Wikipedia suggested me to take a look at this woman (a page about her).

As this is the first time I hear about Maud Gonne, I decided to do some research about her. I don’t feel like writing tonight, but I would like to share the information I found about her in order to remember to write something about this lady in the future. Maybe I will use some aspects of her life in order to create a new character or something like that. I don’t know!

Were you able to answer this question without taking a look at the picture above? 

No? No problem. Here it goes…

Maud Gonne, married name Maud MacBride   (born Dec. 21, 1866, Tongham, Surrey, Eng.—died April 27, 1953, Dublin, Ire.), Irish patriot, actress, and feminist, one of the founders of Sinn Féin (“We Ourselves”), and an early member of the theatre movement started by her longtime suitor, W.B. Yeats.

The daughter of an Irish army officer and his English wife, Gonne made her debut in St. Petersburg and later acted as hostess for her father when he was assistant adjutant general in Dublin. Converted to republicanism by an eviction she saw during the 1880s, she became a speaker for the Land League, founded the Daughters of Ireland (a nationalist organization), and helped to organize the Irish brigades that fought against the British in the South African War.

In the meantime Gonne had become a noted actress on the Irish stage. In 1889 Yeats fell in love with her, and the heroine of his first play, Cathleen ni Houlihan (1892), was modeled after her; she played the title role when the play was first produced at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin. However, Gonne refused Yeats’s many marriage proposals. She had become involved with a French journalist in 1887 while recovering from an illness, and she later bore two children by him. The death of their first child helped to precipitate her interest in spiritualism. In 1903 Gonne married a fellow revolutionary, Major John MacBride. After suffering abuse at the hands of MacBride, she legally separated from him in 1906 and gained custody of their daughter.

MacBride took part in the 1916 Easter Rising, after which he was executed. Following his death, Gonne began using MacBride’s name again to advance her standing in revolutionary circles. She herself was imprisoned for six months in 1918 for her supposed involvement in a pro-German plot. Their son, Sean MacBride, later became foreign minister of Ireland and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize. A book of her reminiscences, A Servant of the Queen (i.e., Ireland), was published in 1938.

PORTAL DA LÍNGUA INGLESA has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-partly internet websites referred to in this post, and does not guarantee that any context on such websites are, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.
In some instances, I have been unable to trace the owners of the pictures used here; therefore, I would appreciate any information that would enable me to do so. Thank you very much.
Is something important missing? Report an error or suggest an improvement. Please, I strive for accuracy and fairness. If you see something that doesn't look right, contact me!
Did you spot a typo?
Do you have any tips or examples to improve this page?
Do you disagree with something on this page?
Use one of your social-media accounts to share this page:

Nenhum comentário: