Poucas palavras:

Blog criado por Bruno Coriolano de Almeida Costa, professor de Língua Inglesa desde 2002. Esse espaço surgiu em 2007 com o objetivo de unir alguns estudiosos e professores desse idioma. Abordamos, de forma rápida e simples, vários aspectos da Língua Inglesa e suas culturas. Agradeço a sua visita. "Stay hungry. Stay foolish!"

quarta-feira, 27 de agosto de 2014

English idioms: Food


Idea Factory: UESC English Language Teaching Convention - BA

Idea Factory: UESC English Language Teaching Convention - BA


When: Friday, August 29th 2014, 8am - 6pm
Where: UESC - Campus Soane Nazaré de Andrade (Salobrinho), Km 16 - BR-415, BA



About the Event


O Programa de Formação de Professores (PARFOR) da Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC-BA), com o apoio do projeto de extensão “Dinamizando o ensino da língua inglesa na UESC” do Departamento de Letras e Artes (DLA), realizará no dia 29 de agosto, das 08h00 às 18h00, no Auditório Paulo Souto, o evento Idea Factory: UESC English Language Teaching Convention 2014, com o tema “Interculturality in the English classroom: what cultures should we teach?”. As inscrições e/ou a submissão de trabalhos são gratuitas e podem ser feitas mediante envio da ficha de inscrição (anexo I do Edital Nº 109) preenchida para o e-mail do evento: elt.convention.uesc@gmail.com.


Aproximar os professores e estudantes de língua inglesa do PARFOR/UESC e dos cursos de graduação e de pós-graduação de Letras (presencial e EAD) e de LEA da UESC, profissionais e estudantes que lidam com o ensino dessa língua na região de abrangência da UESC, nas redes pública e privada; oferecer oportunidade de divulgação de experiências pedagógicas e curriculares de cursos de línguas da UESC e de outras IES, bem como de professores/coordenadores de língua inglesa das redes pública e privada de ensino e de cursos de idiomas da região de abrangência da UESC; promover a discussão de temas relevantes para o profissional de Línguas Estrangeiras, com enfoque na língua inglesa; e promover o lançamento de obras relevantes, de autores nacionais, na área de ensino e aprendizagem da língua inglesa.


Maiores informações: elt.convention.uesc@gmail.com / www.uesc.br 


segunda-feira, 25 de agosto de 2014

How To Plan A Task Based Grammar Lesson.



·   1
Choose Your Language Goal
What do you want your students to be able to do? You will plan your lesson around a given language goal, for example, negotiating a contract for your business that will be lucrative for your company. Both parties in the language exercise should have a different goal, so while one company is trying to reach an agreement that will benefit them financially, the other company will be doing the same for their company. Ultimately, the language users will need to meet somewhere in the middle for their agreement by using any language strategies at their disposal.
·   2
Identify the Necessary Language Skills
Once you have your language goal in mind, you will need to think about how your students will get there. What grammar do they need to know to accomplish the task you will assign them? Do they need to know specific vocabulary? In this example, your students will need to know specific business vocabulary, but they will also need to negotiate using polite suggestions (What if my company did A for you and your company did B for us?) and use the conditional structure when they ask about their partner’s willingness to agree to terms. (Would you supply the materials for $3000 instead of $5000?) In this case, students might also need to write up a contract defining their agreement. If so, they will also need to write their plans using future tenses and business appropriate language.
·   3
Introduce the Lesson
Introducing the lesson to your students will have two parts. First, you will make sure they understand exactly what their goal is during the task, in this case, what each company is trying to achieve in the agreement. After you have explained the goal, you will review any grammatical structures and vocabulary that will be necessary to accomplish the task. You will not have your students practice the different grammar points in isolation from the main goal of the lesson. (That is, they won’t do exercises at their seats or with a partner specifically designed to practice a given grammar point.)
·   4
Students Perform the Task
This is where the lesson actually happens. Students interact with one another within the set parameters to accomplish their language goal. These language tasks might be playing a game, sharing an experience, solving a problem, or participating in a role play that requires problem solving. While they do the assigned language task, they will likely use the grammar structures you presented in step three, but they do not have to. The goal of the task is to achieve the goal, and as long as students accomplish that the task is successful. It doesn’t matter how they got there. At this point, your students might also make mistakes with the grammatical concepts you introduced to them. Do not correct them. Encourage students to use language fluently even if it comes at the cost of accuracy.
·   5
Students Self-Evaluate
After the language task is accomplished, you should give your students some time to reflect on how they accomplished that task. Let them discuss the activity in the groups they performed the task in. Have students write out how they accomplished the language goal, whether they used the grammatical structures you presented or not, and what other strategies they used. Then have the groups share with the rest of the class how they accomplished their goals either orally or in writing.
·   6
Focus on Specific Language Structures
The final step in presenting a task based grammar lesson is taking time to focus on the grammatical points at hand. This final stage of the lesson is where students practice a particular structure and you can give feedback on accuracy. This looks more like traditional grammar classes, but it comes at the end of the lesson and isn’t emphasized at the cost of fluency.


Cartoon: Abbey Road Jihadists.




This cartoon by Blower from The Telegraph shows a group of armed Jihadists walking across a pedestrian (or zebra) crossing as a police officer leans out of a police vehicle, which has stopped to let them cross.

COMMENTARY
Of course, the cartoon is based on the iconic cover of the Beatles' Abbey Road album. The message seems to be that Jihadists are now walking the streets of London (and the rest of Britain), and there's nothing the police can do about it. Today's Times cartoon by Gary Barker has a similar theme.

TRIVIA NOTE
The third Jihadist is walking barefoot, just like Paul did on the original cover, helping to fuel the 'Paul is dead' conspiracy theory.
From the English blog.

PORTAL DA LÍNGUA INGLESA has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-partly internet websites referred to in this post, and does not guarantee that any context on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.
In some instances, I have been unable to trace the owners of the pictures used here; therefore, I would appreciate any information that would enable me to do so. Thank you very much.
Is something important missing? Report an error or suggest an improvement.
Did you spot a typo?
Do you have any tips or examples to improve this page?
Do you disagree with something on this page?
Use one of your social-media accounts to share this page:


sexta-feira, 22 de agosto de 2014

Do you know how to say El Camino de Santiago in English?



In Spanish they El Camino de Santiago. Hopefully you will understand what I am talking about here.

I love travelling and visiting places. I usually don’t plan a lot. I just go for it instead. There’s nothing like meeting people you have never imagined you would meet before you do it. Although I have never traveled that route, I would say that I think I’d enjoy it.

Anyway… I’m too tired to write a great post here tonight. I’ll try to go straight to the point, otherwise, I would take a big risk of writing something completely nonsense.



Do you know how to say El Camino de Santiago in English? If you don’t know how to say that, let me educate you.

In English, we say Way of St. James. James? But where does this James come from? Well, in English, Tiago is actually James. Therefore, that is why we use Way of St. James instead of Way of Santiago or something like that. You guys are very intelligent, so I suppose you must have realized that ‘St’ stands for ‘Saint’, right?

According to Wikipedia:

The Way of St. James, St. James's Way, St. James's Path, or St. James's Trail (commonly known by its name in Spanish: El Camino de Santiago) is the name of any of the pilgrimage routes (most commonly the Camino Francés or French route) to the shrine of the apostle St. James the Great in the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in Galicia in northwestern Spain, where tradition has it that the remains of the saint are buried. Many take up this route as a form of spiritual path or retreat, for their spiritual growth. Brazilian author Paulo Coelho wrote the book "The Diary of a Magus (Magician)" or "The Pilgrimage" based on his own experience along this way.

Read morre: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Way_of_St._James







Pilgrims from all over the world have been following the Way of Saint James for a thousand years. The pilgrimage remains as alive today as ever, and many people come to enjoy the hospitality offered at every stage of the way and discover much more than a journey.


No pain, no glory! 


Would you like to discover Spain through the route of the Way of Saint James?



PORTAL DA LÍNGUA INGLESA has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-partly internet websites referred to in this post, and does not guarantee that any context on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.
In some instances, I have been unable to trace the owners of the pictures used here; therefore, I would appreciate any information that would enable me to do so. Thank you very much.
Is something important missing? Report an error or suggest an improvement.
Did you spot a typo?
Do you have any tips or examples to improve this page?
Do you disagree with something on this page?
Use one of your social-media accounts to share this page:

quinta-feira, 21 de agosto de 2014

The Origins of 10 Nicknames


1.  WHY IS DICK FROM RICHARD?


The name Richard is very old and was popular during the Middle Ages. In the 12th and 13th centuries, everything was written by hand and Richard nicknames like Rich and Rick were common just to save time. Rhyming nicknames were also common and eventually Rick gave way to Dick and Hick, while Rich became Hitch. Dick, of course, is the only rhyming nickname that stuck over time. And boy did it stick. At one point in England, the name Dick was so popular that the phrase "every Tom, Dick, or Harry" was used to describe Everyman.

2.  WHY IS BILL FROM WILLIAM?


There are many theories on why Bill became a nickname for William; the most obvious is that it was part of the Middle Ages trend of letter swapping. Much how Dick is a rhyming nickname for Rick, the same is true of Bill and Will. Because hard consonants are easier to pronounce than soft ones, some believe Will morphed into Bill for phonetic reasons. Interestingly, when William III ruled over in England in the late 17th century, his subjects mockingly referred to him as "King Billy."

3.  WHY IS HANK FROM HENRY?


The name Henry dates back to medieval England. (Curiously, at that time, Hank was a diminutive for John.) So how do we get Hank from Henry? Well, one theory says that Hendrick is the Dutch form of the English name Henry. Henk is the diminutive form of Hendrick, ergo, Hank from Henk. Hanks were hugely popular here in the States for many decades, though by the early 90s it no longer appeared in the top 1,000 names for baby boys. But Hank is making a comeback! In 2010, it cracked the top 1,000, settling at 806. By 2012 it was up to 685.


4.  WHY IS JACK FROM JOHN?


The name Jack dates back to about 1,200 and was originally used as a generic name for peasants. Over time, Jack worked his way into words such as lumberjack and steeplejack. Even jackass, the commonly used term for a donkey, retains its generic essence in the word Jack. Of course, John was once used as a generic name for English commoners and peasants, (John Doe) which could be why Jack came became his nickname. But the more likely explanation is that Normans added -kin when they wanted to make a diminutive. And Jen was their way of saying John. So little John became Jenkin and time turned that into Jakin, which ultimately became Jack.

5.  WHY IS CHUCK FROM CHARLES?


"Dear Chuck" was an English term of endearment and Shakespeare, in Macbeth, used the phrase to refer to Lady Macbeth. What's this have to do with Charles? Not much, but it's interesting. However, Charles in Middle English was Chukken and that's probably where the nickname was born. 

6.  WHY IS PEGGY FROM MARGARET?


The name Margaret has a variety of different nicknames. Some are obvious, as in Meg, Mog and Maggie, while others are downright strange, like Daisy. But it's the Mog/Meg we want to concentrate on here as those nicknames later morphed into the rhymed forms Pog(gy) and Peg(gy).

7.  WHY IS TED FROM EDWARD?


The name Ted is yet another result of the Old English tradition of letter swapping. Since there were a limited number of first names in the Middle Ages, letter swapping allowed people to differentiate between people with the same name. It was common to replace the first letter of a name that began with a vowel, as in Edward, with an easier to pronounce consonant, such as T. Of course, Ted was already a popular nickname for Theodore, which makes it one of the only nicknames derived from two different first names. Can you name the others?

8.  WHY IS HARRY FROM HENRY?


Since Medieval times, Harry has been a consistently popular nickname for boys named Henry in England. Henry was also very popular among British monarchs, most of whom preferred to be called Harry by their subjects. This is a tradition that continues today as Prince Henry of Wales , as he was Christened, goes by Prince Harry. Of course, Harry is now used as a given name for boys. In 2006, it was the 593rd most popular name for boys in the United States. One reason for its upsurge in popularity is the huge success of those amazing Harry Potter books.

9.  WHY IS JIM FROM JAMES?


There are no definitive theories on how Jim became the commonly used nickname for James, but the name dates back to at least the 1820s. For decades, Jims were pretty unpopular due to the "Jim Crow Law," which was attributed to an early 19th century song and dance called "Jump Jim Crow," performed by white actors in blackface. The name "Jim Crow" soon became associated with African Americans and by 1904, Jim Crow aimed to promote segregation in the South. Jim has since shed its racial past, and is once again a popular first name for boys all by itself, sans James.

10.              WHY IS SALLY FROM SARAH?


Sally was primarily used as a nickname for Sarah in England and France. Like some English nicknames, Sally was derived by replacing the R in Sarah with an L. Same is true for Molly, a common nickname for Mary. Though Sally from the Peanuts never ages, the name itself does and has declined in popularity in recent years. Today, most girls prefer the original Hebrew name Sarah.


NOMES DAS PROFISSÕES EM INGLÊS:
Esta é uma lista com as principais profissões e suas traduções para português.

PORTAL DA LÍNGUA INGLESA has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-partly internet websites referred to in this post, and does not guarantee that any context on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.
In some instances, I have been unable to trace the owners of the pictures used here; therefore, I would appreciate any information that would enable me to do so. Thank you very much.
Is something important missing? Report an error or suggest an improvement.
Did you spot a typo?
Do you have any tips or examples to improve this page?
Do you disagree with something on this page?
Use one of your social-media accounts to share this page:


quarta-feira, 20 de agosto de 2014

The mystery of motion sickness - Rose Eveleth.

Although one third of the population suffers from motion sickness, scientists aren't exactly sure what causes it. Like the common cold, it's a seemingly simple problem that's still without a cure. And if you think it's bad on a long family car ride, imagine being a motion sick astronaut! Rose Eveleth explains what's happening in our bodies when we get the car sick blues.